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White coats: the long and short of it

Financial Times Weekend Magazine | September 9, 2011

By Kiran Gupta

It is a symbol of professionalism, yet some claim it creates a psychological barrier between physicians and patients.

Why medicine is often a family affair

Financial Times Weekend Magazine | September 2, 2011

By Kiran Gupta

Learning to earn the trust of relatives is vital in providing the best possible care.

The human side of medicine: what our patients teach us

Financial Times Weekend Magazine | August 26, 2011

By Kiran Gupta

Occasionally, we are touched deep within and forced to experience the realities of life and loss.

The tyranny of the night-shift pagers

Financial Times Weekend Magazine | August 19, 2011

By Kiran Gupta

The little black beeper stays with us, day in and day out, for the entirety of our internship training.

Knowing your place can cost lives

Financial Times Weekend Magazine | August 12, 2011

By Kiran Gupta

Medicine has a long history of hierarchy, which does not always serve the patient well.

Saving the patient from the system

Financial Times Weekend Magazine | August 5, 2011

By Kiran Gupta

We doctors must remember that at some point in our life we will walk in the shoes of our patients.

Why July is the cruelest month

Financial Times Weekend Magazine | July 29, 2011

By Kiran Gupta

Right now, more than 22,300 first-year residents are descending on hospitals across the US.

Being rich and famous can shorten your life

Financial Times Weekend Magazine | July 22, 2011

By Kiran Gupta

VIP or not, it is the doctor’s job to treat their patients with respect, not to cater to their whims and fancies.

When hospitals become hotels

Financial Times Weekend Magazine | July 15, 2011

By Kiran Gupta

Doctors should feel responsible for the well-being of a healthcare system with limited resources.

When exhaustion is a crucial part of the job

Financial Times Weekend Magazine | July 8, 2011

By Kiran Gupta

Concern over physicians’ schedules makes sense: we all know that chronic exhaustion contributes to medical error. But the pendulum may be swinging too far in the opposite direction.

When ‘sorry’ gets you sued

Financial Times Weekend Magazine | July 1, 2011

By Kiran Gupta

The ability to say sorry when things go wrong is key to any relationship, including that between patient and doctor. But in America, we have long been advised not to apologize to our patients. It could be used to build a malpractice case against us.

The American way of (denying) death

Financial Times Weekend Magazine | June 17, 2011

By Kiran Gupta

In the US, efforts to reform end-of-life care quickly lead to concerns about “pulling the plug on grandma”. Dying is inevitable. Doctors are not divine; we cannot cure everyone. But the US healthcare system – which emphasizes heroic interventions using advanced technologies – sometimes leads physicians to believe that death is a failure.
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